Marktplaats adds popular lead-management tool

17 Mar 2017

All auto dealers on EBay-owned Marktplaats.nl are now directed to a special site, where they can look at a wealth of information on the leads generated by their auto ads. The information is also usefully presented in visual form.

Currently, 86 percent of auto listings on Marktplaats comes from professionals – among the highest professional shares of all horizontals in the world.

The information on leads on Marktplaats is compiled and presented by the lead management software LEF, which has become popular among Dutch car dealerships. LEF was created by a Dutch tech vendor called UName-It. At this stage, LEF is only available in Dutch.

With LEF, dealers can follow the performances of their listings in real time. It collects information on email and phone leads, and on the number of final conversions and car purchases.

LEF enables marketplaces to:

+ combine all the lead sources into one feed; and see

+ what the quality of lead follow-up within the company is;

+ who exactly follows the leads;

+ how many orders come from which leads and,

+ what the turnaround time per lead is.

The cooperation with LEF is one of many steps Marktplaats.nl has taken over the years to enhance its service to dealers.

Apart from lead management, Marktplaats Auto offers 24-hour, 6-day a week telephone support; a call-tracking tool (from Swedish start-up Freespee), which catches and saves unanswered phone calls; an auto configurator for new auto buyers; an online showroom space for dealers; and a separate site for new cars called NieuweAutoKopen.nl, which duplicates all car listings Marktplaats deems “new” (we reported about it here).

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Anastasia Gnezditskaia

Anastasia Gnezditskaia has joined AIM Group in 2014 as a writer/analyst covering France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Eastern Europe. A Russian living in Antwerp, Belgium, she has a background working for trade publications covering markets and their regulation. She is educated at Moscow State Lomonosov University (MA in psychology) and Central European University (PhD in public policy). After obtaining her doctoral degree, she taught international political economy at George Washington University in Washington DC where she lived for 10 years. Following this she managed international development projects in Africa at the World Bank, and worked as a journalist covering Congress, federal government agencies and commodity markets, particularly shale gas development in North America.